Bees in a heart


David Suzuki’s Mother’s Day e-card catalogue

Declare your love for nature! Send an e-card to the moms in your life and make a donation in honour of pollinators! Each card lets your loved ones know some interesting, science-y info about bees and butterflies that share our precious planet. Each features original art by Sarah Lazarovic, exclusive to the David Suzuki foundation. Best of all: Your purchase will help support programs like the Butterflyway Project, a community-led effort creating highways of pollinator habitat in five Canadian cities.

E-card purchases are actually donations, so you’ll receive a tax-deductible receipt for the entire amount. And because e-cards require no paper, postage or transportation, they’re easy on the Earth you want to protect.

Select the number of cards you'd like to purchase of each kind and click the "Add to cart" button. You’ll be able to add your personal message later on in this process. Please note: each card you purchase may be sent to one recipient only.

Mom, it's a monarch!

Species diversity is critical to the healthy functioning of ecosystems. From the microscopic level of genes to large-scale biological systems, and from natural ecosystems to human communities, diversity brings strength and resilience in the face of ever-changing conditions. In today's world, that's more important than ever.

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$20.00

Thanks for bee-ing you!

Of the 20,000 known species of bees in the world, about 800 are native to Canada, including mason bees, bumblebees and one the size of the head of a pin! Bees eat nectar (loaded with energy-boosting sugar) and pollen (for proteins and fats). A bee-friendly garden contains a variety of plants that flower at different times. Create pollinator habitat where you live!

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$20.00

Butterfly kaleidoscope

There seems to be no official name for a group of butterflies. They’re called a “flutter,” a “flight,” a “rabble,” a “swarm” or a “kaleidoscope.” We prefer the latter because this world includes a wondrous variety of butterflies of stunning shapes and colours. A group of caterpillars is called an “army”… Makes sense! (The David Suzuki Foundation calls a group of volunteer butterfly enthusiasts “Butterflyway Rangers”!)

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$20.00

Monarch for a day

Like all butterflies, monarchs have four wings: two hindwings and two forewings. Look closely! Do you know how to tell a male from a female? Males have a black spot on a vein on each of their hindwings. Females don’t have this spot. Like birds, bees, wasps and all other butterflies, monarchs are pollinators — part of the reproductive force that keeps nature’s cycles going.

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$20.00

Treasure hunt

In nature, the more you look the more there is to see — and the same goes for this e-card! Amidst the beautiful rainbow cloud of butterflies are eleven tiny hidden natural treasures your mom can find — you can even look for them with her. Can you see the octopus? How about the bee, grizzly bear, starfish, beluga whale, caribou, Blue Dot, orca (killer whale), heart, salmon or (believe it or not) a canoe?

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$20.00

Butterfly bouquet

It’s easy to grow a pollinator garden: Choose native flowers and shrubs, include both annuals and perennials that bloom at different times to provide a food source throughout the growing season. Remove spent blossoms (deadheads) on a regular basis to encourage new growth. And don’t use pesticides.

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$20.00

I heart you!

People in Canada love butterflies! Almost 200 have volunteered for our pilot Butterflyway Project in Richmond and Victoria, B.C., Toronto and Markham, Ontario, and Montreal, Quebec. A Butterflyway is a highway of habitat for butterflies, bees and other beneficial bugs. Volunteer Butterflyway Rangers are planting pollinator patches in their communities. Soon Butterflyways will be blossoming in private, public and institutional spaces, from yards and balconies to parks and schools!

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$20.00

MOMarch

Isn’t it amazing what Moms do for their kids? Monarch butterflies migrating northward from Mexico stop along the way to lay eggs on milkweed — the primary source of food for their caterpillars. Adults normally live just a few weeks. The butterflies make their way north over several generations — arriving in Canada in late June or early July. Toward the end of summer, a "super" generation is born. These butterflies survive for seven or eight months, and it is they — the great-great-grandchildren of those that left the previous spring — who make the incredible journey south.

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$20.00

Caterpillar cuteness

Like all butterflies, monarchs eat nectar from flowers. But as caterpillars, they primarily eat one specific plant — milkweed — and can consume an entire leaf in less than four minutes! Milkweed belongs to the family Asclepiadaceae that includes hundreds of species and blooms in a range of brilliant colours. Common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) usually grows wild in fields and along roadsides — places historically blanketed with native plants. But milkweed has been virtually eradicated from farmers’ fields and roadsides, leaving monarchs in serious trouble.

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$20.00

You give me butterflies

Monarch butterflies depend on milkweed to survive. Over the past few decades, more than one billion milkweed plants have been lost across North America, largely due to widespread use of the herbicide glyphosate (Roundup) on millions of hectares of agricultural land. Monarch butterflies are perilously close to extinction. Planting milkweed throughout the monarchs’ migratory range is the single most important thing we can do to help them.

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$20.00